Posts Tagged ‘scarf’

Last Rose of Summer

I’m excited to introduce you to Last Rose of Summer! This little scarf or shawlette is a great transitional piece to bridge the gap between summer and fall.

It’s also a great project to use up those gorgeous mini-skeins you couldn’t resist at the trunk show, or those luxe bits of cashmere you have hanging out in your stash. It lends itself particularly well to a gradient set.

This lacy hexagon looks impressive, but is surprisingly simple to make! It can be worn in a number of ways, making it a very versatile addition to your wardrobe!

Last Rose of Summer is available on Ravelry and LoveKnitting.

Diamond Collection

I have a new collection out, just in time for holiday knitting! I am thrilled to introduce you to the Diamond Collection. This collection contains 3 patterns available separately, or at a discount as an e-book.

Centenary scarf

The first and easiest pattern in this collection is Centenary, named for one of the largest diamonds ever unearthed. This fully reversible scarf is surprisingly beginner friendly, consisting entirely of knits and purls with no shaping at all.

Orlov gloves

The second pattern in the collection is Orlov, named for a diamond in the Russian crown jewels. Appropriate for intermediate knitters, this is actually quite a fast little pattern if you’ve knit gloves before. Ideal for a last minute gift!

Koh-i-Noor hat

The final and most adventurous pattern in this collection is Koh-i-Noor, named for a diamond in the UK crown jewels. This giant, super-slouchy beret will keep your head and ears toasty warm all winter long.

If you’re looking for a luxurious matching gift set to give this season, or just something beautiful to keep yourself warm, I hope you’ll indulge in the Diamond Collection!

Snowed In Collection

It’s cold out there! Have you been snowed in yet? Need a quick project or three to get you through until you can go outside again? Do I ever have the collection for you!

My Snowed In Collection is an e-book of 3 patterns each designed to be knit in the stretch of time you might be stuck inside during or after a storm. The neckwear patterns come in a range of estimated times and difficulties:

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Snowzilla is the fastest and easiest of the patterns. Very beginner-friendly, it requires only knits and purls with no shaping or fancy pattern stitches. It’s also a great way to use up some handspun or that unpredictable art yarn you bought at a show.

 

StormCloudShoulders.jpg
Storm Cloud is the next easiest pattern in the collection, and due to its chunky-weight yarn likely to take about as long as Snowzilla. It does introduce a new-to-may technique, fishermen’s rib, with a photo tutorial. This extra stretchy, extra warm stitch is surprisingly easy to learn, and a good precursor to learning brioche.

 

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Cabin Fever is likely to take a bit longer than a weekend – you may want to save this one for a monster storm! When the cabin fever has set in, and you’re about to lose it, learning a new technique can be a great distraction! This beautiful two-color scarf pattern serves as a great introduction either to two-color brioche, or to brioche overall. The written instruction are accompanied by both a photo and video tutorial, if either technique is new to you. If you’ve already learned the stitches needed for fishermen’s rib with my Storm Cloud, you’ll have a head start!

All 3 patterns are available for purchase separately on Ravelry, but now through December 31 you can get the whole collection for the price of one pattern when you buy my e-book!

Ice Blossoms

The next pattern in my series with Salt River Mills is a gorgeous lace scarf called Ice Blossoms. Ice blossoms (aka frost flowers) are a natural phenomenon that occurs when thin ribbons of ice are extruded from pores in the soil or cracks in plant stems during the coldest parts of winter. There’s nothing quite like a shiny “flower” in the dead of winter, whether they’re from ice or a cozy Suri-silk blend!

ice blossoms detail

The best part about this elegant lace scarf? It’s completely reversible! I am a serious sucker for reversible scarves, and reversible lace in particular. For more info and pictures, be sure to check out the pattern pages on Ravelry and the North American Suri Co. site.

ice blossoms close

The Operation Gratitude Collection

I’m excited to finally share with you my latest e-book, the Operation Gratitude Collection. This one’s free, because I’m hoping knitters will choose to send their FOs off in care packages, or otherwise be generous with them. There are 3 patterns in this collection, all of which are reversible and all of which are on the easy side compared to many of my patterns.

commando watch cap

The Commando Watch Cap is probably the most difficult of the patterns, as it requires you to be able to work in the round as well as to k2tog and p2tog. It is a nice, generic beanie which looks interesting enough to keep me happy, but my husband assures me is “plain” enough to keep actual servicemen happy.

 

commando scarf

Its mate the Commando Scarf is even simpler, requiring only knit and purl stitches with no decreases. It is also worked flat, but matches the hat nicely.

 

sgt reckless

The third and final pattern in the collection is the Sgt. Reckless Scarf, named after a rather famous warhorse in American history. This scarf requires the same beginner-friendly skills as the other scarf in this e-book, but also provides an opportunity to practice changing colors and attaching new yarn.

All in all this is a bit of a departure from my usual work, but I’m proud of it and hope that you’ll at least take a peek. And if you’re wondering about the collection name – yes, I am donating the samples to Operation Gratitude.

A Few Charity Knits

Over the weekend I finished the scarf I was knitting for Operation Gratitude.

scarf

 

Since I still had a fair bit of the skein of Fisherman’s Wool left and a bit of room left in the shipping box, I cast on for a matching hat.

hat

 

This is pretty much the current “purse project”, so it’ll probably be done some time around the end of the month. Then it’ll be time for some quick photos (maybe I can get my USMC hubby to pose in them!) and into the mail they’ll go. Hope they go someplace they’ll be loved!

Travel Knitting

We’re in the midst of moving right now, and I haven’t had time to knit more than a half dozen stitches in days, but last weekend I got plenty of knitting done. So let me tell you about it!

Last weekend we drove all the way to Connecticut for my cousin’s wedding, and since Hubby drove a significant portion of it, I got to work on my scarf for the Military KAL. Between the simple pattern and the hours and hours in the car, I pretty near finished it.

scarf

Then we had a chunk of time between this:

ceremony

 

and this:

reception

 

so I got almost a dozen rows done on this:

shawl

 

With the chaos around me now, I’m kinda wishing last weekend could’ve just continued!

Operation Gratitude

Since my last attempt at a nice, mindless project didn’t go so well, and I still have lots of hours of waiting around ahead of me in the next few weeks, I’ve decided to try again. I’m going to make a nice, simple diagonal rib scarf for Operation Gratitude, a charity that sends care packages to deployed U.S. servicemen as well as those wounded in combat. As a veteran’s wife and a knitter, it seemed like a pretty nice way to burn through some stash.

scarf

I’m going to host a little KAL/CAL in my Ravelry group if anyone’s interested in joining. All the relevant details can be found here, and donations to servicemen in other (non-US) militaries are also welcome. It’s a great way to use up some stash!

Sky Scarf 2012

It took me a few days to get the blog post together, but I did complete my Sky Scarf on the 31st. It is awesome! It really did serve its purpose of making me more mindful of the weather (and noticing how much it really does affect my mood) and serves as a nifty souvenir of 2012. It turned out really super long:

long scarf

But luckily I intended to connect the end and wear it as a big, showy cowl. As an added bonus, I get to look at a much larger proportion of the stripey goodness all the time.

sky cowl

I’ve worn it out in public twice now, and raised surprisingly little interest. There was one fellow knitter (apparently) among the parents dropping their kids off at work who latched on right away to the fact that I’d probably made it, but most people haven’t even looked twice at it, let alone commented. It seems off for a cowl (infinity scarf?) this massive and colorful, with such irregularly placed stripes and beads. I’m sure happy with it though!

sky scarf

Relief

There were some big storms last night and this time they actually brought cool air with them. You know, like they’re supposed to. Oh my goodness I feel like a new woman. The forecast high for today is only 86 (30 C) and while that’s only slightly below normal for this time of year, after the heat wave we’ve had it sounds like the most balmy, deliciously comfortable weather ever.

carnaby

Carnaby in progress – I forgot how fast patterns go when I don’t have to do all the math myself.

In fact, it’s so nice that I actually took my knitting outside for a bit this morning. Bliss! I love the way the air smells after a good rain; I can almost forget that I live in the city. It’s also nice that my Sky Scarf finally has a break in all the blue (that sounds like an odd thing to be happy about, I know). It seems like the weather has broken all over the U.S., because my cousin out west says the fires are finally about under control there and people are beginning to pick up the pieces.

On the other hand, the peppers loved all the hot and dry the last couple weeks, so despite the best efforts of that surprise derecho we had, they are looking bushy and strong and I’m starting to get some baby peppers!! Can not wait to start eating those!

peppers

Baby peppers!

As an aside, my parents actually missed out on most of the heat with a well-timed vacation to Alaska. They brought me back what has to be the most unique souvenir I’ve ever seen – a crochet hook made of moose bone. I feel like it needs an extra special project to christen it. Any suggestions?

moose hook

It appears to be an L hook. Quite large.

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