Posts Tagged ‘spring’

Eastern Woodland

So I’m a bit behind on posting this to the blog, but if you follow me on Ravelry or belong to my designer group, you probably already know I released a pattern earlier this week!

long view

Eastern Woodland is a great lace sampler that is undeniably inspired by this time of year. If you follow me on Twitter or Instagram you’ve probably noticed my wildflower obsession lately. Living in what is naturally oak forest, there are quite a few woodland flowers in my neighborhood right now. I love love love seeing them all every time I go for a run or walk the dog, and they seeped into my brain enough that I decided to knit them too.

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Every ring of Eastern Woodland is inspired by a different wildflower native to the eastern U.S. From the starflower to the lily of the valley and every panel in between, this pattern is spring incarnate.

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Feeling some lace? Just need to inject some springtime into your knitting? Try Eastern Woodland!

Planning

Springtime makes me want to knit lace. Silk too, but I pretty much always want to knit silk. And wear it. And rub it all over my face. Ahem.

hepatica flat

Behold…lace AND silk.

So at the moment I am between projects except for one monstrous, involved upcoming design that I can’t bear to touch at the moment. Lace seems like an obvious choice, right? Except that every time I start looking at lace ideas I suddenly remember that cables are my very favorite thing ever. Also, beads sound really fun all of the sudden.

Swept Away beads

Beads!

Much like gardening, dreaming up projects is half the fun in knitting, but also a little overwhelming sometimes. It doesn’t help that there’s nothing I actually need at the moment, knitting-wise.

So..what to I want to make? Help me blogosphere!

Springtime Rituals

When the crocus bloom, I know I can safely wash and put away my heaviest sweaters.

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Those went away almost two weeks ago, as you can probably tell by the fact that these crocus are past their prime. Then when the hepatica and periwinkles start to bloom, I can usually safely put away my Hepatica hat and all those other winter accessories.

I saw both of those flowers on my run today, which means I should be washing and retiring winter accessories this weekend. Except…there are snow flurries in the forecast for Sunday. It may be 73 currently, but that’s not going to last.

Mother Nature is a cruel, moody tease. I’m going to go enjoy my flowers while it’s warm enough to do so.

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Quiet Signs of Spring

My house smells like spring.

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I’ve never tried forcing bulbs indoors before, but it was a really good idea. This hyacinth smells so good, and it really is wonderful to see something blooming this early in March.

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There are also some tantalizing hints of spring outside. All of my spring bulbs have sprouted, and the overwintered alliums (garlic, chives, etc) are beginning to look happy and energetic again. We had 3 days in a row where the high was over 60 this week.

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And a sure sign of spring in the knitting world? Lace knitting has returned! I’m seeing more and more Ravelry and Instagram friends casting on lace projects, and my own lace shawlette test knit is underway in my Rav group! If you’d like to join in, be sure to check out the link!

Hepatica

Well hi there strangers! I can’t believe I haven’t posted here since the last time I published a pattern. I suppose that’s the hazard of testing season. 😦

In any case, I have a fun springtimey hat for you today!

hepatica hat

Hepatica features a beautiful floral motif that is perfect for spring. Its elegant, lightweight silk blend and lacey pattern make it ideal for bridging the gap between cold and warm seasons.

hepatica flat

Named for a common spring-blooming wildflower, this hat is knit top down and features both charted and written instructions. It’s a great one-skein pattern that knits up quickly and makes an ideal weekend stashbuster. I hope you’ll try it!

buy-now

Spring Fever

I am alive! Spring has arrived and I’ve been a bit distracted by real life lately, so forgive me for not posting much on the blog!

crocus

As much as I’ve been doing lately, there’s really not much to talk about! It’s mostly been teacher stuff, which is often time consuming but not really that interesting to hear about. There has been plenty of knitting and pattern writing though. The next pattern in the tie collection is only waiting on photography. Can’t wait to get it out there!

Things are also happening over in my Ravelry group. If you haven’t taken my KAL survey yet, please do! I’m hoping to launch one soon! I’ve also got a test knit starting soon. Want early (and free) access to my upcoming hat pattern? Come test it for me!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Happy “Do I get to pinch you?” Day, as my students seem to think of it. As you’ve probably seen in my previous posts, I have plenty of Irish heritage. However, St. Patrick’s Day in the U.S. is arguably not much about Ireland anymore, if it ever was. The kids and I did celebrate today though, with plenty of green and shamrocks. Hubby and I will also celebrate tonight with some Netflix and a pint of Irish red he brewed up for the occasion.

mohair sweater

Because I teach elementary school, the above sweater won out over my traditional Aran today. Sadly that may be the closest thing to knitting I get today, judging by the number of papers I have left to grade tonight. I am busily working away at two upcoming designs though, neither of which are quite ready for sharing yet. So in lieu of sneak peeks, here is some green from my garden!

daffodil bud crocus bud

I DO Believe in Spring, I do, I do!

Looklooklooklooklookit!

green

GREEN. The hyacinths have made an appearance, although worryingly the crocus have not. There are daffodil shoots poking their heads out of the leaves too! Every year the calendar says spring is coming, and every year, towards the end, I worry that it might not actually be true. But here is evidence!

I don’t even care that my kitchen floors will look like this for the next 2 months,

mud

or that my shoes and dog won’t look any better. I’m not sad about putting away knitting because honestly? Air conditioning is frigid here in Virginia. The knits will be made and worn all summer long. Besides, we’ve still got a few more weeks of frosty mornings for hats and blanket knitting. I went for a run today. Outside. As if I live someplace humans actually want to live. Spring might actually, finally be here. So excited!!

Spring Knitting

Spring has truly sprung around here – it’s been in the 70s and sunny the last couple days here, and warm and stormy before that. This kind of weather is great for running and my garden, but for a lot of knitters, this is where the knitting stops. Being the addict I am, I can’t imagine not knitting for more than a day or two, much less a whole season. So if you’re like me, what do you knit this time of year?
Spring Projects for Spring
Many spring-like patterns knit up quickly and can be worn right away in spring. Socks are particularly great for this. Patterns like my Bel Air and Flourishing Fields are perfect for that stretch of time where “too chilly for bare feet” meets up with “still way too warm for sweaters”.
bel air

Bel Air Socks

If you want knitting that’s appropriate for both knitting and wearing in spring, small and fast is definitely the way to go. Lacier versions of your winter accessories, for instance my lace cowl Bâtonnage also help bridge that gap between hot and cold. You can further this effect by using fiber blends that retain less heat, such as cotton and bamboo.

Spring Projects for Summer

Spring is also a good time to start planning what you want to wear this summer. Yes, you can indeed wear handknits in summer. Knitting tanks in lightweight yarns and cool, silky fibers is a beautiful thing. Tanks like my Lovely and perennial favorite Catch are great examples of projects you’ll want to start soon if you plan to wear them all summer.

catch

Catch

Lightweight cardigans and lacy shawls like my Leonardtown and tiny Sea Spray are also good for keeping the chill off in over air-conditioned restaurants and shops, without being so heavy and warm as to be unpleasant to knit now.

Spring Knits for All Seasons

Some knits have no season. I tend to think shawls fall into this category, and if you knit openwork ones like my Swept Away you won’t have to worry about the “blanket effect” having a denser shawl-in-progress in your lap can create. As large shawls can take a while to complete, you’ll be extra grateful for your choice come summer. One word of advice, though – trading your yarn out for a summery plant-blend is not a good idea for lace projects. They really need a fiber with memory, like wool, to hold their lace patterning nicely. Choose a pattern with a lightweight yarn instead.

Swept Away

Swept Away

Of course, you may disagree that shawls are seasonless, or live somewhere so hot that even the thought of a lace shawl in your lap is too much (this also applies for summer knitting). In that case, what about non-wearables? Household objects like my Aeration tend to be too small to create heat problems, and don’t go on your body at all!

So those are my favorite things to knit in spring. In fact, I’m currently working on a new top for summer myself. What do you like to knit in spring?

Thirsty Thirty

The Husbeast turns 30 today, and has requested we spend the day at the local microbrewery. Since the weather is gorgeous, he has deigned to also visit one or two of the local wineries. Naturally I’m bringing socks.

socks

Yes, those are indeed the self-striping comfort socks. As you can see, by the time I got up the energy to cast them on I didn’t really need them anymore, but they will certainly serve me well for a day of buzzed outdoor knitting. Off to find the sunscreen!

P.S. This is why living near wineries is awesome:

winery

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